The Flying Suffragists

On December 2nd, 1916, at Midland Beach, Staten Island, New York, a group of suffragists attempted a wild publicity stunt, which involved a biplane, and then President, Woodrow Wilson. The idea was to ‘bomb’ President Woodrow Wilson on his yacht, the Mayflower, as it made its way down the Hudson River en route to the illumination of the Statue of Liberty. This “bomb” consisted of yellow petitions from “woman voters of the West” and leaflets in support of the Susan B. Anthony suffrage amendment. Written by Anthony, with the assistance of Elizabeth Cady Stanton, this amendment called for the extension of the right to vote to women. First presented to Congress in 1878, by 1916 it had been rejected by the Senate twice, and had recently been defeated in the House of Representatives in January 1915. Not until 1920 would woman suffragists be victorious with the passage of the 19th Amendment.

 

The suffragist pilot,  was Leda Richberg-Hornsby, Leda was one of the pioneer female aviators of the 1910s. She attempted several times to join the US flying corps as a combat pilot in France during the First World War. Her service was refused.

 

 

Check out Kate Carew’s interviews with leading personalities of the 20th century….

Jaffa Scribe @Jaffa Films, LLC.

 

“Rediscovering Kate Carew”

 

A film Produced by: Jaffa Films, LLC

 

Director/Producer: Barnard Jaffier

 

Writer: Anna Jhirad

 

Editors: Lewis Erskine and Laia Cabrera

 

Executive Producer: Samuel Pollard

TM All Rights Reserved.

 

 

Photo # 1, Members of the National American Woman Suffrage Association, 1916

Source: New York Public Library (NYPL)

 

Photo # 2,  Aviator, Leda Richberg-Hornsby 1914

Source: Library of Congress

 

 

 

THE MEN WHO INVENTED THE NEW YORK SUBWAY

John B. McDonald was one of Americas’ most successful railway contractors in the late 1880s-1900s. In 1894 the people of New York voted to create a tunnel for a subway which was to be owned by the city. After six years of preliminary work by the Rapid Transit Commission, bids were accepted to build and operate the subway on November 15, 1899.  A bidding war resulted with only two companies vying for the contract to build New York’s subway system. The Onderdonk Construction Company and John B. McDonald. McDonald successfully bid for the New York Subway contract and won on January 15, 1900.

1885-Subway-Construction copy 2

McDonald proposed to construct the tunnels for $35 million with an additional $2,750,000 for station sites, terminals and other fees. The money for the construction was loaned by the city. It was to be paid back with interest in fifty years. McDonald organized a construction company with August Belmont. Another company within this company, the Interborough Rapid Transit Company (IRT) was organized to operate the subway. The IRT had the opportunity of operating the system for 50 years, with an option for a 25 year renewal. When the subway passed into the hands of the people, the equipment was to be purchased by the city at a valuation to be determined by arbitration. McDonald sublet the construction to thirteen sub-contractors. Ground was broken March 25, 1900 in front of City Hall.

William Barclay Parsons, was the first chief civil engineer of the New York Rapid Transit Commission, and was responsible for the construction of the Interborough Rapid Transit (IRT) subway line. An engineering whiz, Parson was only 45 when his underground masterwork was completed. 

It was an age of endless urban optimism, in which the city was building furiously out and upward.

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Kate Carew saw it all…

 

“When Kate Carew talks to William Barclay Parsons or John B. McDonald, she’s talking to people who designed and built the subway, and any New Yorker, anybody who’s ever come to New York, has been on that subway. It’s not a different system. They may make the stations a little bit fancier and might put on different artwork, but the fact is those are still the same subway systems that she rode before anybody else did. Her interview has her going into the subway with William Barclay Parsons, and they get on a train before it’s officially open, about two days before it actually opened. So the people that she talked to still have an effect on our lives, and the celebrity culture that she helped to establish, that’s still is the lingui franca of today.”

                                                                                                      Archivist/Curator, David Leopold

 

 

 

 

Jaffa Scribe @Jaffa Films, LLC.

 

 

“Rediscovering Kate Carew”

 

 

A film Produced by: Jaffa Films, LLC

 

 

Director/Producer: Barnard Jaffier

 

 

Writer: Anna Jhirad

 

 

Editors: Lewis Erskine and Laia Cabrera

 

 

Executive Producer: Samuel Pollard

 

TM All Rights Reserved.

 

 

 

Photo: Mary Williams aka Kate Carew

 

Source: Chambers Collection

 

Anna Held

Anna Held (1870-1918),  “the brains and inspiration” behind Ziegfeld’s Follies. Anna Held was known for her risqué songs, flirtatious nature and willingness to show her legs on stage. Anna was the most popular American musical comedy star during the two decades preceding World War I. In the colorful world of New York theater during La Belle Époque, she epitomized everything that was glamorous and sophisticated, at the turn-of-the-century.

 

 

 

Anna Held was a favorite of stage-door Johnnys; men who routinely lingered around theatres for the purpose of courting an actress, singer or chorus girl. Ziegfeld Follies star, Eddie Cantor said, “For a generation, America succumbed to the Anna Held craze.”

 

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Imagine….

“Imagine Oprah Winfrey as a caricaturist-interviewer in 2014 and now you have an idea of who Kate Carew was.”

Ambrose Bierce

 

Ambrose Gwinnett Bierce was born on June 24, 1842 in the settlement of Horse Cave, Ohio.

In San Francisco, city newspapers began to receive literary submissions from Bierce, mostly essays and comic sketches. The San Francisco-based News-Letter was a weekly magazine.  The News-Letter, was a financial magazine aimed at businessman, that contained satirical content. When James Watkins resigned from the News-Letter in 1868, Bierce replaced him as managing editor. The new editor took over the paper’s existing column, “The Town Crier.” From this literary position, Bierce targeted the city’s hypocrites and political scoundrels. Bierce’s writing was characterized by sharp wit, and precise language. These columns attracted the attention of readers beyond San Francisco, and were at times quoted in the newspapers of New York and even London.

During Ambrose Bierce’s time at the News-Letter, Bierce met and became familiar with a wide number of Western journalists and writers, among them Mark Twain. In 1888/1889 Ambrose Bierce visits Kate Carew’s drawing studio; impressed by her work, Bierce introduces Carew to William Randolph Hearst’s newspaper, the San Francisco Examiner, and its editors.  Mary Williams/ Kate Carew is later hired as a staff writer for The Examiner.

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“That’s all there is, there isn’t any more.”

Theatrical producer, Charles Frohman, first saw the young Ethel Barrymore in the stage play,  ‘The Bauble Shop’, then cast Barrymore in several of his stage productions ….the rest is history.

 

In 1901, Ethel Barrymore rose to stardom when Charles Frohman gave her the leading role of Mme. Trentoni in “Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines.” The production opened at the Garrick Theater on February, 4th, 1901.

 

 

 

Following Barrymore’s triumph in Captain Jinks, Ethel gave crowd-pleasing performances in many top-rate productions, and it was later known, that she would utter to audiences her most famous line,

 

“That’s all there is, there isn’t any more.”

 

 

For behind the scenes archival still photos from the production, “Captain Jinks of the Horse Marines.” visit our Facebook page here.  https://www.facebook.com/pages/Kate-Carew/379543642995?ref=hl

 

 

Women Need the Vote

 

Suffragettes on their way to a rally in Boston (1917)